Is it a Knowledge Check or a Quiz?

a-plusIn the midst of designing a facilitator-led curriculum for a client, we were met with a conundrum: according to our SME(s), one particular class just had to have  a quiz at the end. There were many problems with this idea, including the fact that  none of the other 6 courses in the curriculum ended with a quiz and that the audience was new-hires - so how intimidating would a quiz be? We finally compromised on a Knowledge Check - that way our SME felt fulfilled (and  we fulfilled compliance requirements) but the learners wouldn't be too intimidated  (we hoped). What's the difference? you ask
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Interview with Will Thalheimer, PhD

Thalheimer (1)What motivated you to write this book? I've worried about my own smile sheets (aka response forms, reaction forms, level 1's) for years! I know they're not completely worthless because I got useful feedback when I was a mediocre leadership trainer-feedback that helped me get better. But I've also seen the research (two meta-analyses covering over 150 scientific studies) showing that smile sheets are NOT correlated with learning results-that is, smile sheets don't tell us anything about learning! I also saw clients-chief learning officers and other learning executives-completely paralyzed by their organizations' smile-sheet results. They knew their training was largely ineffective, but they couldn't get any impetus for change because the smile-sheet results seemed fine.   So I asked myself, should we throw out our smile sheets or is it possible to improve them? I concluded that organizations would use smile sheets anyway, so we had to try to improve them. I wrote the book after figuring out how smile sheets could be improved.
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Interview with Learning Expert: Will Thalheimer

Measuring Learning Results T/D: You've written a research in practice report called Measuring Learning Results which is an understanding of learning and focusing on measurement.  Can you tell us more about that? Thalheimer: Over the years I've been immersed in learning and looking at the research on...

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5 General Rules for Workplace Tests Part-5

Rule #5 Ordering Questions You may wish to group evaluation questions by topic or you may mix them up. Back on the job, the work people encounter won't show up in any kind of logical sequence – so mixing questions up has its merits. On the other...

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5 General Rules for Workplace Tests Part-4

Rule #4 Use Key Words Key words assist the test-taker in figuring out the answer. Who triggers the respondent to look for a person or position What triggers the test taker to look for a thing or a process Where triggers them to look for a place or location When...

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5 General Rules for Workplace Tests Part-3

Rule #3 Stick to the Facts Do not include trivial information - the only intention of which is to confuse the test taker. For instance: Bob and Ed left their office on K Street in Washington DC at 4:45 pm to travel to BWI airport for a...

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5 General Rules for Workplace Tests Part-2

Rule #2 Give Adequate and Specific Instructions Instructions are critical. Do everything you can to make sure test takers know WHAT to do, and WHEN and HOW to do it. Examples: • If there is a time requirement, state it. e.g. you must finish this section in 30 minutes •...

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5 General Rules for Workplace Tests Part-1

RULE #1 Do Not Trick Them If you have not taught “it” in the training, it should not be on the test. In addition, your test questions should be stated in the same manner they were stated/taught in the class. For example: if you teach the three...

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